You can pipe together your project from bottom-up or top-down. Each software application being launched is called a Process. Any file connected with a Process is called a Resource. You can chain together as many Processes as needed using Connectors, in any order (parallel and/or series).

A collection of Processes can be grouped into a Composite. The total collection of all Processes, Resources, and Composites is a Pipe-It Project. The Runner orchestrates, without user intervention, intelligent and efficient launching of all Processes in a Pipe-It Project. Literally any data in Resource files can be accessed with Linkz. An entire Pipe-It Project can be run time-and-again with changes to any input data using the Optimizer, with built-in or plug-in solvers such as Experimental Design, derivative- and non-derivative-based NL and MINL methods.

Pipe-It provides lego-like simplicity to provide complex interconnectivity. We have only three primary elements (building blocks) – Resource, Process, and Connector. Resource is a file. Process is an application. Connector is a line with directional arrowhead, to connect Resources and Processes. We refer to a collection of Resources, Processes, and Connectors as a Pipe-It Project.

Simple rules apply: An upstream Resource can connect to any number of Processes downstream, while a downstream Resource can connect to a single upstream Process. A Process can connect with (receive information from) any number of upstream Resources, and the Process can connect with (send information to) any number of downstream Resources. Resources don’t connect directly with other Resources; only through a Process do Resources connect. Processes don’t connect directly with other Processes; only through Resources do Processes connect.

The fourth element is a Composite, which is simply a collection of the primary elements Resource-Process-Connector, and other sub-composites. The composite allows complex multi-facited integrated systems to have an intuitive layout with easy manueverability. The composite can, in some cases, function as a Pipe-It sub-project, with its own optimizer.

The Pipe-It Runner automatically orchestrates, without user intervention, intelligent and efficient launching of all Processes in a Pipe-It Project. Literally any data in Resource files can be accessed with the intuitive graphical interface Linkz. An entire Pipe-It Project can be run time-and-again with changes to any input data using the Pipe-It Optimizer, with built-in or plug-in solvers such as Experimental Design, derivative- and non-derivative-based NL and MINL methods.

A Pipe-It project can be built in two fundamental ways: Top-Down or Bottom-Up. Green fields are candidates for top-down design, while brown fields are often candidates for bottom-up design. Any field can be built with either approach, or with a hybrid design.

We have often found that the top-down design is fast and can be completed in days or weeks. Once the entire project is piped together with Pipe-It, a second process starts, to fill the project with appropriate models describing the fluids at each point in the system. This second process can be conducted in several stages, with the most-trivial models being simple connection to existing data bases, empirical models like decline curve forecasts being available with little effort, and more-complex models like numerical simulators requiring considerable time and effort to build and integrate into the Pipe-It project.

Any integrated project is designed with a clear vision of how all entities in a petroleum project are laid out and interconnected. The top level might constitute points of product delivery and ownership transfer: Asset-level processing facilities, gas pipeline export, and oil storage. Multiple fields may be contributing to the asset, with field gathering lines for gas and liquid stream feeds.Each field might have multiple local processing units, again piping products to the field level. Individual wells and well groups feed the local processing units, being piped locally from wellheads. At the well level, multiple geologic formations may contribute to the wellstreams produced, being piped through production tubing(s) to the wellhead. Injection into wells must also be handled, and once again from wellhead to geologic formation(s) through tubing. The reservoir models describing fluid flow from the geologic formations into wellbores are discretization to correctly allocate and distribute fluids with varying properties from different zones within a geologic formation. Darcy’s law – used in all such reservoir simulators – describes fluid flow through microscopic “pipes” describing the porous rock containing reservoir fluids.

Example Pipe-It Usage

RESERVOIR MODELING

  • Blackoil-to-compositional conversions so you can use (e.g.) ECL100 instead of ECL300.
  • Coupling multiple reservoir models.
  • History matching & sensitivity studies.

SURFACE PROCESSING

  • Create accurate streams from reservoir models for detailed surface process calculations.
  • Extremely fast process module that can reproduce nearly any Hysys/Unisim process model.

WELL TESTING

  • Convert well test rates with varying separatorconditions to rates with a common surfaceprocess.

PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

  • Production allocation.
  • Multi-phase flow meter modeling.
  • Transient well startup.

FIELD OPTIMIZATION

  • Field-wide choke control to optimize oil production with multiple field constraints.
  • Mature field tie-ins for optimal utilization of existing infrastructure.
  • H2S & CO2 tracking & constraint control.
  • New Asset field in-phasing optimization.
  • Product blending optimization.